Summer Eco-Gifts & Clothes

Ahh here in Yorkshire the sun has finally shown it face! So I wanted to share our latest summer collection of eco-friendly gifts and t-shirts. We’ve got eco-friendly organic cotton Japanese inspired t-shirt & sweatshirt featuring the artwork of Johnnyinthe56, handmade earrings by Revive Vintage crafted with vintage 1980’s reclaimed beads, a set of 3 hand-printed lino print cards featuring the Mushroom Girl design by Gray and finally a really pretty handmade Lavender bag crafted from reclaimed vintage 1930’s embroidered cotton and more items are on their way!.

I hope you enjoy our eco-friendly creations, thanks for taking a look!

Have a great week!

Sarah X

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Summer 2022 Earring Trends

Here’s a quick pick of our Handmade, eco-friendly earrings that are trending for Summer 2022…

Enjoy!

  • Handmade earrings
  • Wire earrings trending for summer 2022
  • Made in Yorkshire
  • Length: 8 Centimetres; Width: 1 Centimetres
  • Materials: Sterling Silver ear hooks & reclaimed wire links & beads
  • Gemstone: Jade
  • Style: Art deco
  • FREE worldwide shipping
  • Handmade earrings
  • Stripes on trend for summer 2022
  • Made in Yorkshire
  • Materials: reclaimed vintage glass beads & sterling silver ear hooks
  • Style: Art deco
  • FREE worldwide shipping
  • Handmade earrings
  • Transparent is a leading trend for Summer 2022
  • Made in Yorkshire
  • Materials: Reclaimed vintage glass beads & sterling silver ear hooks
  • Style: Art deco
  • FREE worldwide shipping
  • Handmade earrings
  • Made in Yorkshire
  • Materials:Reclaimed Carnelian gem stone beads & sterling silver ear wires
  • Style: Art deco
  • FREE worldwide shipping

Thanks for looking & have a great great week!

Sarah x

How to Do Nature Bathing.

‘What’s nature bathing?’ I hear you say. Well, very simpley it’s: being in nature, and it has some good research to show that it’s really good for us! On this basis, I think its a good thing and so I had a look at it as an experience and concept. I’ve been practising it for some months and really enjoy it and the sense of wellbeing it brings – also it’s VERY eco-friendly, so I wanted to share it with you.

Nature bathing is all about spending quality time in a natural environment. It’s a little bit more than a quick stroll around your park or garden, but, it can be acheived in most environments. The benefits to your health and wellbeing have been researched and they’re real and significant. We can all do it, so here’s the 5 easy steps to getting the most out of your nature bathing.

  1. Find or create a natural environment. Ideally, the deeper the natural environment the better, but, that being said, many of us live in urban environments and don’t have easy access to the countryside. The important aspect is that you can access the sights, sounds, smells and sensations of nature, so a woodland, the seaside, the countryside, local park, garden, backyard, balcony or even an open window can all work for your nature bathing.
  2. Get yourself into your ‘natural environment’ If you’re in a confined space, position yourself so you can see as many plants and as much sky as possible.
  3. Now get bathing! This means being in your natural environment, without distracting yourself with other things. It’s best to avoid, all devices, no coffee, no excercising, no chatting – just be in your natural environment.
  4. Get comfy – stand, sit, lie down, stroll or even a very gentle jog are all good, and it’s fine to change position during your nature bathing time.
  5. Here’s the really important part: pay attention. Notice and experience each of the different aspects of your natural environment. Take some time to really enjoy the sights, sounds, smells, and sensations of the natural environment. Engage with the ‘big picture’ experience and also take notice of the tiny details within the environment. If your natural environment is limited, try to guide your attention towards the aspects that are natural, so that you’re not distracted by the none natural elements. For example: if you’ve got traffic noise, take your attention to the colours and textures of the plants, watch the movement in the sky. Finally, engage with your naturing bathing as often as you can and for as long as feels natural – Relax & Enjoy!

Thank you & have a great week!

Sarah x

Jade

Jade is a naturally occuring mineral most often found in shades of Green, but it can also be found in Browns, Oranges, White, Cream and Pink. It can be carved and polished to a very smooth finish, lending itself perfectly to jewellery making. Jade features strongly in Asian art, but also appears in many other cultures and locations, including South America, Canada and New Zealand.

Jade can refer to two different types of mineral: nephrite, a silicate of calcium and magnesium, or jadeite, a silicate of sodium and aluminum.

Nephrite Jade was first used during Neolithic times, in China, for utilitarian and ceremonial items. It came from the now-depleted deposits in the Ningshao area in the Yangtze River Delta and Dushan Jade was being mined as early as 6000 BC.

Jade was used to create many objects, from decorative housewares to jade burial suits. Jade has been considered to be the “imperial gem”, from the earliest Chinese dynasties to the present day. In Lantian, Shaanxi white and greenish nephrite jade is found in small quarries and as pebbles and boulders in the rivers. The river jade collection is concentrated in the Yarkand, the White Jade (Yurungkash) and Black Jade (Karakash) Rivers. On the southern part of the Silk Road, annual payments consisting of the most precious white jade were made to the Chinese Imperial court. They were worked into valuable objects d’art by skilled artisans. Jade became a favourite material for the crafting of Chinese scholars’ objects, such as rests for calligraphy brushes, as well as the mouthpieces of some opium pipes, due to the belief that breathing through jade would bestow long life.

Jadeite, in vivid emerald-green, pink, lavender, orange and brown was imported from Burma to China after about 1800. The bright green jade became known as Feicui (翡翠) or Kingfisher (feathers) Jade. It quickly became almost as popular as nephrite and a favorite of the nouveau riche, while scholars still preferred nephrite (white jade, or Khotan), which they felt symbolised noblemen.

The Chinese character 玉 (yù) is used to denote the several types of stone known in English as “jade” and because of the value added culturally to jades throughout Chinese history, the word has also come to refer more generally to precious or ornamental stones and is very common in more symbolic usage as in phrases.

In the history of the art of the Chinese empire, jade has had a special significance, comparable with that of gold and diamonds. Jade was used for the finest objects, including grave furnishings for high-ranking members of the imperial family. Today, due to it’s cultutal significance and the rising middle class in China, the value of jade and it’s popularity has increased greatly, with the finest jade, seeing a tenfold increase in value making it a popular choice for collectors across the world.

I hope you find this information useful.

Thanks & Enjoy

Sarah